Thursday, July 31, 2014
     

At Work

  • Close the place of business.
  • If customers, clients, or visitors are in the building, ask them to stay in the building. When authorities provide directions to shelter-in-place, they want everyone to stay where they are, and not drive or walk outdoors.
  • If the business has voice mail, change the recording to indicate that the business is closed, and that staff and visitors are remaining in the building until authorities advise it is safe to leave.
  • Close and lock all windows, exterior doors, and any other openings to the outside.
  • If you are told there is danger of explosion, close the window shades, blinds, or curtains.
  • Have employees turn off all fans, heating and air conditioning systems. Some systems automatically provide for exchange of inside air with outside air – these systems, in particular, need to be turned off, sealed, or disabled.
  • Gather disaster supplies, such as nonperishable food, bottled water, battery-powered radios, first aid supplies, flashlights, batteries, duct tape, plastic sheeting, and plastic garbage bags.
  • Select interior room(s) above the ground floor, with the fewest windows or vents. The room(s) should have adequate space for everyone to be able to sit in. Large storage closets, utility rooms, pantries, copy and conference rooms without exterior windows will work well. Avoid selecting a room with mechanical equipment like ventilation blowers or pipes, because this equipment may not be able to be sealed from the outdoors.
  • Use duct tape and plastic sheeting, heavier than food wrap, and seal all cracks around the door(s) and any vents into the room.
  • Write the names of everyone in the room, and call your business’ designated emergency contact to report who is in the room with you.
  • Listen to the radio or TV until you are told all is safe or you are told to evacuate. Local officials may call for evacuation in specific areas at greatest risk in your community.